Online Courses

You can browse the catalogue of Winter Session online courses below or locate additional details to include open courses on Class Search PATH by selecting “Winter Session” as Part of Term and also select Open Classes. 

  • NCSI 31000 Adaptive Leadership in Modern Organizations

    • Instructor: M. Cody Brockelmeyer
    • Department of Naval Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 48

    In this course, students will develop and apply a personal leadership philosophy applied against a series of case studies covering various industries. In collaboration with the professor and fellow students, we will gain a better appreciation for the ways that diversity, empathy and experience may be adapted to fit the human dynamics associated with organizational leadership.

  • PSY 13181 Adolescent Development (Social Science USEM)

    University Requirement (USEM): University Seminar

    • Instructor: Dawn Gondoli
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 16

    Adolescence is a fascinating period of the lifespan to study. It has been considered “the best years of one’s life,” “a developmental disturbance,” “the transition to adulthood,” and “not quite a period” (not quite a child and not quite an adult). Unfortunately, many myths and misconceptions surround this time of life. In this course, we will examine – through discussion of theories, research methods, and empirical findings – the dramatic and meaningful changes in adolescents’ physical, cognitive, and social characteristics. We will emphasize the social contexts of adolescent development – family, peer groups and culture, including media influences. Students will build their understanding of normative and problematic development during adolescence and will learn about issues of special concern to adolescents, their families, and professionals who study adolescents or who encounter them in applied settings. While encountering class materials and assignments, students will build their written and oral communication skills, and will develop proficiency in reading, describing, summarizing, integrating and applying scientific literature within academic psychology.

  • EALC 43101 Advanced Chinese Conversation

    • Instructor: Chengxu Yin
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 2
    • Max Seats: 18

    This course is designed to help students who have already completed three years of Chinese language learning or equivalent to develop advanced-level Chinese speaking skills. It adopts a collaborative language learning approach. Through activities such as discussion, presentation and team-work projects, students will expand their knowledge of the social and cultural reality of contemporary China as they acquire new vocabulary, structural patterns and language registers to express more complex ideas and opinions and discuss issues in various social contexts.

  • MEAR 30303, 60303 Advanced Conversational Arabic

    • Instructor: Ghada Bualuan
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 12

    This course is intended to increase spoken Arabic proficiency and socio-cultural competence by focusing on the development and enhancement of intermediate skills in speaking and listening through the use of texts and multimedia materials in Modern Standard Arabic. It also takes into consideration dialectical diversity. Class time will be spent in conversation and discussions after students read chosen texts and prepare assignments on audio-visual materials outside of class.

  • WR 13400 Advanced Writing and Rhetoric - Mastering the Craft of Letters: Personal, Professional, and Public

    University Requirement: WRRH (Writing and Rhetoric) and WRIT (Writing Intensive)

    • Instructor: Matthew Capdevielle
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 16

    This course is an intensive study of advanced rhetoric through the lens of one of the most powerful rhetorical forms: the letter. Letters are a form of writing that we all practice in our personal, professional and civic lives. Through a study of published letters that have influenced policy decisions, effected social change and simply moved their readers, we will examine the unique power of persuasion in the epistolary mode. Exploring together the subgenres of personal letters (e.g. letters home, letters of gratitude and apology, love letters), professional letters (e.g. memos, complaints, recommendations, resignation letters, letters of application) and public letters (e.g. encyclicals, letters to the editor, open letters), students will compose and revise a series of letters within these subgenres to extend and hone their persuasive writing skills through the practice of ethical and effective rhetoric in the epistolary mode. At a time when our relationships with others are under great strain — both due to the physical distancing necessitated by the pandemic and due to the deep ideological divisions in our communities — we need more than ever to cultivate the skill of establishing meaningful and durable connections with our fellow human beings. This course puts that effort to connect at the center of our study of rhetoric and provides new tools to engage meaningfully with others via writing.

  • ARCH 43201 American Housing and Social Justice

    • Instructor: Marianne Cusato
    • School of Architecture
    • Credit Hours: 2
    • Max Seats: 18

    This course will follow the evolution of housing in the context of American Urbanism over the last hundred years and explore not only the methods employed to discriminate against minority communities, but also how these policies have ended up failing the suburban and rural communities they were intended to privilege. Consequently, the outcomes are not only ongoing racial injustice but also a nationwide affordable housing crisis and crumbling infrastructure. The course will be broken down into three parts. We will explore the history and evolution of housing segregation; the current results of decades of racist policies and actions; as well as potential ideas to reverse the inequities in housing to create a stronger future for all communities. This course is open to all students in the university at all levels. No existing knowledge of School of Architecture or urbanism is required.

  • AL 20000 Around the World in Film and Literature

    • Instructor: J. Creech & K. Swanke
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course is our gateway to the exciting world of contemporary global film and literature. We’ll investigate how directors and writers author their messages through genre, cinematography, editing, narrative and point-of-view. In addition to analyzing the textual qualities of these works, we will ask broader questions about studying global arts. How can we read across cultures while respecting differences? How are films and literature changed by translation? How do shared films and literature help us find meaning and community in a diverse world? By the end of this course, we will be cosmopolitan audiences ready to explore global film and literature on our own.

  • ARHI 34417 Art, COVID-19 and Black Lives Matter: The Global View from London

    UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENT: WKAR (Fine Arts) & WRIT (Writing Intensive)

    • Instructor: Lois Oliver, Alice Tyrell, Gemma Bencini, Kendal Jones
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    2020 has been an exceptional year. In March 2020 the UK was placed in lockdown to tackle the Covid-19 pandemic, the population was asked to stay at home, and museums and galleries had to close their doors. On 25 May the killing of George Floyd brought renewed attention to the Black Lives Matter movement. In the UK, protestors in Bristol toppled a nineteenth-century statue of seventeenth-century slave trader, Edward Colston, prompting calls for a wider review of the figures represented in public statues across the UK. Around the globe, fundamental questions about how we live, our social and economic structures, and how our past and present are visualised and commemorated, have been thrown into sharp focus. In this course students will explore how UK-based artists and art institutions have been navigating this extraordinary time. Art can open our eyes to the experiences of others, enabling us to see what they have seen or what they have conjured in their imagination; such fundamental human communication is vital at times of crisis. We will consider the economic impact of Covid-19 on the UK arts scene and the UK government measures introduced to mitigate those effects. We will investigate how artists and institutions have found new ways of engaging audiences during lockdown, amid an upsurge in demand for online content. We will explore how auction houses and commercial galleries have adapted their business model during the pandemic. We will also examine how museums are rethinking the interpretation of their collections to present more inclusive and diverse stories. The events of 2020 have emphasised our global interconnectedness: can art foster a new interconnected global perspective?

  • ROIT 10101 Beginning Italian I

    • Instructor: Tiziana Serafini
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 4
    • Max Seats: 16

    This is an introductory, first-year language sequence with an equal focus on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. An appreciation for Italian culture is also encouraged through readings and class discussions. The sequence 10101-10102 is to be followed by ROIT 20201 or ROIT 20215.

  • ROIT 10102 Beginning Italian II

    • Instructor: Patrick Vivirito
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 4
    • Max Seats: 16

    Beginning Italian 2 is the second course in the standard first-year, introductory Italian language sequence: 4 credit hours, meeting daily for nine hours per week of live, synchronous online instruction. It involves independent work by students, largely focused on the acquisition of Italian grammar and vocabulary, to be performed on the Sentieri Vista Higher Learning Supersite and on the University’s Learning Management System. Daily Zoom sessions with your instructor will focus largely on mastery of conversational (aural and oral), written and general comprehension skills, as well as cultural awareness. Daily homework exercises in reading, listening,and speaking, in addition to writing assignments and speech recordings, will be done on the Supersite.

  • ROSP 10102 Beginning Spanish II

    • Instructor: Shauna Williams
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 4
    • Max Seats: 16

    This course is an elementary, second semester Spanish course. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing will be taught in cultural contexts. Because this is an accelerated course, students must regularly self-study material before class so that the lesson can proceed at the needed pace. Online work will include vocabulary and grammar exercises, listening activities, brief writing exercises, pronunciation practice, and short videos. By studying the material and practicing it online before class, our time together can be focused on communicating in the target language. Pre-req: ROSP 10101 or by placement. This course is followed by ROSP 20201 or 20215.

  • ROFR 33300 Beyond Berets and Baguettes: An Introduction to French Culture from Couture to Cuisine

    • Instructor: Alison Rice
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This 1-credit course will incorporate a variety of visual materials into each session, including art, photographs, and film. All sessions will take as their point of departure a French film that students will watch before we meet and will entail a presentation by the professor followed by discussion on subjects ranging from Netflix's Emily in Paris to French slam. Conversations will cover French Humor, French Music, French Monuments, French-American Relations, French Food and French Fashion, as well as the particularities of the French Language, and have fun exploring and debunking a slew of French stereotypes along the way.

  • SCPP 46397 Biomedical Case Studies in Medicine

    • Instructor: Kathleen Kolberg
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 48

    This course will focus on the biomedical aspects of medicine that expand on foundational courses like physiology or biochemistry. It would give a more in-depth insight into the health professional’s role across a variety of disciplines. Alumni health providers will present a clinical case study, give the background of the case, guide students through their methodology (thought process and actions in diagnosis, treatment, and patient interaction), explain how they gather additional resources for difficult cases and describe how they work with the Interprofessional team. Students will read pertinent background information before the case that would be posted on Sakai. Following the session, students would be split into learning groups, each working with the professor or a TA to discuss the case further. A reflection will be due at the end of each week explaining what students learned about the health professional’s role, how basic science applies to clinical care, and how they see themselves connected (or not) to that type of work. Reflection on these experiences will help students process their own understanding of medicine.

  • HIST 30986 Blueprint for Modernity: A Global History

    UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENT: WKHI (History)

    • Instructor: T. Beatty & I. Solares
    • Keough School of Global Affairs
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    This class examines the history of engineering in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and its relationship to capitalism and development on a global scale, with the use of digital tools. Engineers came to design, implement and manage nearly all elements of the modern world from their positions within corporations and state bureaucracies; they quickly became the primary agents in development in the 20th century. We will examine the history of engineering, introduce students to basic tools in data science, digital humanities, and data visualization and students will develop data-intensive research projects using the skills they have learned. The class is designed for students from both arts and STEM disciplines as a window into historical methods and an introduction to using qualitative data for analysis and data visualization. There are no prerequisites.

  • HIST 30988 Boxing in America

    • Instructor: P. Griffin & N. Walker
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 48

    This is a team-taught course, led by a historian and Notre Dame’s boxing coach. In this course, students will study the history of boxing in the United States from the 18th to the 21st centuries. Through a study of the “sweet science,” the class will look at the rise of cities, mass migration, changing understandings of race and class, urban history, and the fortunes and misfortunes of postwar American culture. Students will also learn about the finer points of craft, how training for boxing changed over time, and how technique developed. They will do so by doing it themselves. They will train as boxers did and still do. By doing all this, students will come to appreciate the finer points of a dynamic and changing sport, one tied to America’s past. Each class session will include this sort of active learning, turning what we learn from reading and discussion into the kinetic.

  • BIOS 20100 Brain Disorders and What We Can Do

    • Instructor: Xuemin (Sheryl) Lu
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    The course will be composed of three weekly lectures for a total of 10 lectures. There are no prerequisites and no prior knowledge of the nervous system is required. The course will begin with an overview of the central nervous system, which students will learn basic cell structure (neuron vs. glia), brain nuclei and basic nervous system physiology such as action potential and neurotransmitter release. Following the teaching of the biological essentials, students will learn about the brain through readings, lectures, and discussions of the book, “The Brain that Changes Itself”, written by Dr. Norman Doidge. This is not a standard text, but rather a series of case studies described by a psychiatrist. It is extremely well written and is meant to be approachable to non- experts of the field of neuroscience. Lectures and small group discussion will be the two main formats during each live class meeting. Video clips related to the course topic will be provided for asynchronous learning. By examining in detail several distinct neurological phenomena, students will gain perspective regarding the complexity of our nervous system.

  • MATH 10555 Calculus Workshop

    • Instructor: Lyda Urresta
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 48

    This course is intended as preparation for Calculus 2. We will review some Calculus 1 material, such as integration and the fundamental theorem of calculus, and introduce some Calculus 2 topics, including new integration techniques, differential equations, and infinite series and sequences.

  • AME 20290 Career Choices: Mechanical Engineering

    • Instructor: M. Seelinger & K. Meyers
    • College of Engineering
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 48

    This is a seminar series featuring selected speakers who are employed in fields related to mechanical engineering or are career development professionals. The presentations and open symposium format emphasizes career opportunities for mechanical engineering graduates. Course assignments are focused on personal career development (resume, cover letter, interviewing, networking).

  • CHEM 23203 Chemistry Seminar (Chemistry 23203-1)

    • Instructor: Jon Camden
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 12

    This course must be taken either semester of the sophomore through senior years. It focuses on an introduction to the communication of scientific knowledge.

  • CHEM 23203 Chemistry Seminar (Chemistry 23203-2)

    • Instructor: Kelley Young
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 12

    This course must be taken either semester of the sophomore through senior years. It focuses on an introduction to the communication of scientific knowledge.

  • CHEM 23203 Chemistry Seminar (Chemistry 23203-3)

    • Instructor: DeeAnne Goodenough-Lashua
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 12

    This course must be taken either semester of the sophomore through senior years. It focuses on an introduction to the communication of scientific knowledge.

  • CSEM 23102 College Seminar: Perfect God, Imperfect World

    • Instructor: Linda Major
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 12

    If you could ask God only one question what would it be? According to a recent survey, most people would ask, "Why is there so much pain and suffering in the world?" If God is all-good, all-knowing, and all-powerful how does one explain the existence of moral and natural evil in the world? This course will explore the "Problem of Evil" as treated in theology, philosophy, psychology, literature, and the arts. The course will include readings from Scripture, Plato, Augustine, Peter Abelard, Immanuel Kant, C.G. Jung, C.S. Lewis, Dorothy L. Sayers, Elie Wiesel, and others. Participants will be encouraged not only to examine how this question has been treated, but also to derive a personal position on the nature of evil, its presence in everyday life, and how best to respond to it. The primary tools for this investigation will be a dialectical inquiry and oral presentation. Must be enrolled in The College of Arts and Letters (AL)

  • CSE 40601 Computing Service Project - Community Engagement and Countering Systemic Bias

    • Instructor: Shreya Kumar
    • College of Engineering
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 48

    Computing systems unwittingly help enforce or reinforce systemic bias. In this course, students are taught how to examine bias in systems or make conscious design decisions that prevent bias that, once coded, will persist undetected in systems for a long time. In this course, we will be combining data analysis, data visualization, web development, software development tools and open government data to design, build and analyze systems that allow for civic engagement and explore data bias, systemic bias and social justice related issues in the local community or national community. This course will use Python as the primary language and will examine data in the following formats: csv, json, xml, data from apis, etc.

  • POLS 30162 Conservatism after Trump

    • Instructor: Philip Munoz
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 16

    The Presidency of Donald Trump has upended not only American politics, but also American conservatism. This 1-credit participatory seminar will examine the future of conservatism in America through the study of contemporary conservative political thinkers and their critics.

  • FYS 10107 Contemplation and the First Year Experience

    • Instructor: Hugh Page
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This 1-credit course has, as its primary learning objective, enabling students in their first year of college to incorporate a range of contemplative practices into academic life. It will employ three educational modalities: (1) Online and experiential exposure to a selection of those activities noted in the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society’s (CCMIS), “Tree of Contemplative Practices”; (2) An introduction to select disciplines that stimulate embodied contemplation and promote awareness of the natural, social, and academic environment into which undergraduates are embedded – e.g., virtual library wandering of the library “stacks”; contemplative reading; poetry writing; photography; and martial arts that encourage hard, soft and spontaneous movement; (3) Guided reflection on nine specific educational maxims that seek to promote integrated learning during the initial year of post-secondary education.

  • THEO 60815 Contemplative Ecology

    • Instructor: Matt Ashley
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    In his encyclical on the environment, "Laudato si’," Pope Francis wrote, “More than in ideas or concepts as such, I am interested in how such a spirituality [an ecological spirituality] can motivate us to a more passionate concern for the protection of our world." A commitment this lofty cannot be sustained by doctrine alone, without a spirituality capable of inspiring us, without an “interior impulse which encourages, motivates, nourishes and gives meaning to our individual and communal activity.” This course will explore the resources for such a “contemplative ecology” in both Christian writers and non-Christian ones, with a focus on the United States. It aims to be integrative in nature, covering works in theology and Christian spirituality, but also from the genres of nature-writing, poetry and film and an experiential component. It concludes with a close reading of sections of "Laudato si’" and "Querida Amazonia," enriched by the consideration of resources unearthed earlier in the course. Besides daily posts, discussion and two short papers, all participants will keep a journal with entries drawn from their contemplative observing of a specific natural setting near their home. This graduate course is intended for M.Div and other graduate students in the Department of Theology.

  • ENG 24810 Contemporary Native American Fiction: Reading The Night Watchman

    • Instructor: Michael Pippenger
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 16

    The Night Watchman, Louise Erdrich’s brilliant new novel, was published in March of this year. The novel takes place in the 1950s and is based on the story of her uncle’s fight to save their familial tribe against the federal government’s Indian Termination Act which sought to take away all ancestral lands and legal status from existing tribal nations in order to assimilate them and erase them from the U.S. national landscape and consciousness. The themes of the novel, unfortunately, still resonate today. In 2018, the current federal government revoked the status of the Mashpee Wampanoag nation, “terminating” them as a tribe, directly assaulting their sovereignty and land. As we explore issues of Native American identity, culture, and independence within the novel, we will enhance our slow reading with film, photography, oral history, legal documents and material artifacts.

  • EURO 30007, 60007 Deep Dive into Diplomacy

    • Instructor: Clemens Sedmak
    • Keough School of Global Affairs
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 16

    The course will be offered through the Nanovic Institute for European Studies. The course intends to give students an insight into “becoming a diplomat” and “working as a diplomat” with a special focus on the connection between diplomacy and social justice. The course will be offered through a collaboration with the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna that will assist in identifying visiting speakers. We will work with four experienced diplomats with experience in Europe to understand the formation and necessary skills, the form of life and everyday life, challenges and conflicts and contributions to social justice in the common good experienced in the life of a diplomat.

  • ESS, PSY 20610, 30668 Developing Resilience as a Learner

    • Instructor: Monica Kowalski
    • Institute for Educational Initiatives
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    Grounded in educational psychology theories, this course will explore constructs of conscientiousness, perseverance, grit, growth mindset and resilience. We will discover how social-emotional learning (SEL) competencies of self-awareness and self-management can be utilized to build personal resilience as learners in tumultuous times. The course will include applications to the current reality of learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, while also considering how resilience is continuously developed in one’s self and others in various contexts in the future.

  • THEO 20807 Discernment: Theology and Practice

    University Requirement (2nd Theology): WKDT

    • Instructor: Lenny DeLorenzo
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 72

    This course studies the theology of discernment in the Christian tradition, principally in relation to a theology of vocation as the challenge and possibility of “hearing the word of God and acting on it.” In order to study what it means to “hear," the course will attend to the importance of solitude, contemplation and developing a scriptural memory within the Christian tradition, while also diagnosing the challenges of listening in the modern world. To study what it means to “act” on the word of God, the course will attend to the priority of mercy, commitment and sacrifice in the Christian life. Methodologically, part of the study of discernment will include engaging in and reflecting on practices of discernment that relate to the “hearing” and “acting” dimensions of the Christian vocation. As a Winter session offering, this course will make use of live (synchronous) class sessions along with some recorded (asynchronous) content and regular group meetings (digital of course) among students.

  • AFST, ENGL, ESS, ILS, AMST 33102, 20182, 33629, 33301, 30927 Diversity In Young Adult Literature

    University Literature Requirement: WKLI

    • Instructor: Michael Macaluso
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    In this course, we will challenge the single story(ies) U.S. schools and curricula have told about books, characters and cultural groups by focusing on literature by and about people from various populations that have been traditionally underrepresented in the United States. We will discuss young adult literature from parallel cultures (including possible works by and about African Americans, Asian Americans, Latino/as, Native Americans, Middle Eastern Americans, and other ethnic groups), as well as literature by and about populations traditionally defined by class, ability, religion, gender and sexuality. Course participants will investigate theoretical perspectives, issues, controversies, methods of reading and educational implications for these texts, including race and racism, whiteness and privilege (in society and in the educational system) and critical literacy. As an extension of the course, we will also examine the young adult literature market and how contemporary media may reinforce or resist the stereotypes and single stories associated with these groups.

  • PSY, FTT 30635 Drunk on Film: Psychology of Storytelling with Alcohol

    University Requirement: WKIN (Integration)

    • Instructor: T. Mandell & A. Venter
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 48

    Alcohol Use Disorder is a chronic relapsing brain disease. But when presented on screen, it's entertainment. Why do we laugh, why do we cry, why do we emulate fictional characters whose drinking habits result in a life of debilitating addiction? From Humphrey Bogart to Ron Burgundy the psychology and seduction of alcohol on film and in television will be analyzed. Furthermore, what is the relationship between the manner in which alcohol use/abuse is presented on screen and the manner in which alcohol is used and abused on, for example, college campuses? Surveying film and television history, we will examine how alcohol is used in story structure, as a character flaw or strength and as a narrative device in the story arc of films across multiple film genres (action/adventure, comedy, romance, etc). Why do characters drink, where do they drink,and how does the result of their "getting drunk" advance the narrative? We'll also look at non-fiction films that tackle issues of addiction, as a way of comparing character development in Hollywood films to the results of this same behavior in everyday life. Film materials will include weekly screenings outside of class and academic articles relating to portrayal and analysis of alcohol use in film and television, including the business of marketing campaigns, product placement and box office results. From the psychological perspective we will discuss the topic and process of social influence and how the presence of others influences our behavior. Questions of interest will include the following: What are the mechanisms by which group influence unfolds? How and why might we be persuaded? Does the manner in which alcohol use is portrayed in movies and the media reflect the processes and principles of social influence and if so how? Readings will include chapters on social influence, persuasion and academic articles evaluating the manner in which alcohol is portrayed and advertised and the effect this has on alcohol consumption. In addition, issues of addiction will be discussed, from understanding the basis of addiction to examining the efficacy of addiction treatment.

  • AFST 13181 Education on the Margins and Hope: American (Counter) Narratives (Social Science USEM)

    University Requirement (USEM); University Seminar: WKSS (Social Science)

    • Instructor: Maria McKenna
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 16

    The experiences of marginalized groups in American education are often ignored in the "story" of American education. Understanding these experiences and their surrounding institutional, political, and social influence is critical to our understanding of democracy. This course employs narrative research, biography, and young adult literature to inform our understanding of the ways varied groups are excluded and harmed by mainstream practices in American education. We will also explore stories of hope, resilience, and empowerment from these same perspectives. Making sense of our own stories of education and peeling back the layers of historical, political, and sociocultural contexts that impact education are part of our collective work.To focus our study, we will pay close attention to the African American experience given the significant role this particular group plays in the narrative of American education. This course is *highly* participatory and requires curiosity, engagement, and learning through discomfort. Students will produce three substantive pieces of writing over the course of the WinterTerm.

  • CBE 44425 Energy, Economics, and Environment

    • Instructor: Jennifer Schaefer
    • College of Engineering
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 50

    Energy, economics and the environment are irrefutably linked. Many new energy technologies are under development to meet our future needs, as historical sources of energy may increase in cost with increased global demand or have undesirable environmental consequences. This course will review current and emerging primary energy sources and energy technologies in electricity generation and use, transportation and heating and cooling. A significant focus of the course will be on alternative energy technologies. Energy related practices and technologies will be quantitatively compared. This course requires active student participation.

  • MGA 60754 Entering into Professional Partnerships

    • Instructor: Tracy Kijewski-Correa
    • Keough School of Global Affairs
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This three-week course will support the Keough School’s newly formed Integration Lab (i-Lab) teams in preparing for their Global Partner Experience (GPE) in 2021, using the team’s assigned project and partnership as the nexus for all course activities and assignments. Each of the course’s three week-long modules begins by introducing fundamental concepts using pre-recorded videos, then engages the team in a synchronous work session on Mondays around that module’s conceptual framework. Students work during the week to gather additional background information and then return for synchronous team-based activities (Friday session) to populate that framework. Using this model, i-Lab teams will exit the course with three major products supporting their GPE: (1) desk research culminating in an Annotated Bibliography, (2) a Stakeholder Map and Contextual Analysis and (3) a Theory of Change Framework, as well as essential professional skills necessary to enter effectively into these new professional partnerships. This course is designed for Graduate students only.

  • ESTM 30000 Entrepreneurial Immersion

    • Instructor: John Henry & Ben Hoggan
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 48

    The Entrepreneurial Immersion Course offers students an opportunity to move theory into practice. Students will work with experts in the field of commercialization to collect traction data on a concept, conduct customer segmentation interviews, work with market data, determine investment readiness levels, and ultimately prepare a pitch deck to seek funding. There are no prerequisites for this online-only course.

  • PHIL 20603 Environmental Philosophy

    UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENT (WKSP): 2ND PHILOSOPHY

    • Instructor: Jude Galbraith
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course will focus on the philosophical, ethical, and political dimensions of topics of environmental concern. Specific topics vary by semester. For more detailed information regarding current and upcoming offerings, see https://philosophy.nd.edu/courses/2nd-courses-in-philosophy/.

  • PHIL 20401 Ethics

    UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENT (WKSP): 2ND PHILOSOPHY

    • Instructor: Geoffrey Hall
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    In this course we will deal with ethical questions such as: are abortion and euthanasia wrong? How should we treat animals and the environment? What duties do we have to the impoverished? And we will address meta-ethical issues such as: is there such a thing as objective right and wrong? How do we figure out what is right or wrong? Is God or some supernatural being needed to ground morality? Why should we even be moral in the first place? Students will learn to wield the arguments for and against various positions. They will also defend these positions both orally and in writing by the presentation and criticism of arguments.

  • MGA 60755 Europe Responds to the Refugee Crisis: The German Case

    • Instructor: William Donahue
    • Keough School of Global Affairs
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    Having led the European response to the refugee crisis instigated by the Syrian Civil War, Germany provides an instructive, though by no means typical, case study. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore various aspects of Germany's current policies toward refugees and immigrants and to place them within a wider European context. Students will meet with federal, state and local governmental officials, civil society groups and representatives of international organizations. The issues to be explored include: Germany's policies toward asylum seekers, the relationship between these policies and the European Union, policies to integrate refugees and migrants into German society and the political impact of these policies.

  • LLRO 10100 Falling for Romance Languages

    • Instructor: This course is collaboratively taught by Alessia Blad, Azeb Hailesselasie, Ana Fauri, Marcio Bahia, and Shauna Williams.
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course is designed to open the door into the world of Romance languages and literature at Notre Dame. Over the four-week session, students will be able to explore new cultures, learn new languages and engage in an international community. Each week, students will view an authentic, culturally relevant movie followed by two 60-minute meetings on Zoom for discussions about the movie in English and an hour of interactive and fun elementary language activities. Each week focuses on one of the four main languages offered in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures: French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish. No prior language is necessary.

  • FTT 30135 Film Production Dynamics

    • Instructor: Bill Donaruma
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course will give students who are thinking about taking production classes or for those who have taken the FTT Introduction to Film & TV Production but want to know more about how films are made and specifically how filmmakers use cameras to craft and inform their decision making. Students outside of FTT, who may be looking to apply media to their respective careers, would also benefit from this course as a primer for what they will need to know moving forward in videography and creating media. We will look at the dynamics and applied aesthetics of cameras, lenses and light to create images. This includes the basics of F-Stops and exposure, lenses and light, camera formats and types, from the newest digital cameras to actual film. This will be a live online demonstration class on the DPAC sound stage. Students will engage in conversation and weekly quizzes on the topics and relevant website materials.

  • PHIL 30313 Formal Logic

    University Requirement (2nd Philosophy): WKSP

    • Instructor: Curtis Franks
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 72

    Introduction to the syntax and semantics of propositional logic and quantification theory, with attention to philosophical issues informed by the formal apparatus.

  • THEO 10801 Foundations (Fundamentals) of Theology: Biblical and Historical

    UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENT (1ST THEOLOGY): WKFT

    • Instructor: Bradly Malkovsky
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course is designed to introduce you to the mystery and activity of God as presented in the Bible and Christianity. After briefly investigating various topics having to do with religion in the modern world, including the science-and-religion debate, we will turn our attention to God and to God’s revelation as witnessed to in the Bible and as presented by the teachings of Judaism and Christianity. We will cover some of the major themes, events, and persons of the Bible and seek to understand the relevance of those stories for us today. We will cover such topics as creation, sin, evil and suffering, covenant, mercy, justice, the dignity of the human person, incarnation, resurrection, salvation, discipleship, Church, the Reign of God, prayer, various forms of Christianity, and much more. Throughout the course, we will sometimes turn our attention to the teachings of other religions, so as to better understand what is particular to Christianity.

  • THEO 10001 Foundations of Theology

    University Requirement (1st Theology): WKFT

    • Instructor: Anthony Pagliarini
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 72

    This first course in theology offers a critical study of the Bible and early Christian tradition. Following an introduction to the Old and New Testaments, students follow major post-biblical developments in Christian life and worship (e.g., liturgy, theology, doctrine, asceticism), emphasizing the first five centuries.

  • THEO 10001 Foundations of Theology

    University Requirement (1st Theology); WKFT

    • Instructor: Nick Russo
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 72

    This first course in theology offers a critical study of the Bible and early Christian tradition. Following an introduction to the Old and New Testaments, students follow major post-biblical developments in Christian life and worship (e.g., liturgy, theology, doctrine, asceticism), emphasizing the first five centuries.

  • ASIA, LLEA, STV 30180, 30179 Fukushima Case Study: Recovery and Resilience

    • Instructor: Jessica Warnell McManus
    • Keough School of Global Affairs
    • Credit Hours: 1.5
    • Max Seats: 16

    This course offers an opportunity for an exploration of arguably the most significant natural and man-made disaster in recent history, an event with critical implications for social and environmental justice. The 2011 Tōhoku, Japan, earthquake, tsunami and subsequent Fukushima nuclear tragedy presents a compelling case study of the challenges to recovery and resilience in the wake of major disruption. Around the world, communities are grappling with unprecedented health, economic, and social challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic – the topic of recovery and resilience is more salient than ever. Building on faculty research and site experiences in Japan, students will examine public reports, scholarly analyses, and community stakeholder testimonials to formulate informed perspectives on the elements of and challenges to community recovery and resilience in the wake of this disaster. Central activities will be determining and assessing specific indicators of resilience, to include socioeconomic indicators, which are often left out of existing analyses that typically focus on infrastructure, and considering the issues of economic and social justice inherent in community preparation for, vulnerability to, and response management of natural and man-made disasters.

  • STV 30705 Global Biopolitics

    • Instructor: Anna Geltzer
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    Life — its ordering, management and optimization — has been a central concern of the modern state. Thus biological knowledge is inherently political — not in the sense of ‘political’ that dominates current American discourse (crudely interest-driven and ideological), but in the sense of being implicated in the processes of governance. This course explores the intersection of biology and politics, dedicating equal time to analyzing the governance of life at the level of the individual and the population and the politics of biological knowledge production. We ground the theoretical discussion of biopolitics in a close examination of an empirical case study focusing on an important issue in global health, which students play a role in selecting.

  • KSGA 24000 Global Professional Experience

    • Instructor: Jonathan Noble
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 100

    This course is designed for students who have registered for Notre Dame International's Virtual Global Experience Program. Students are matched with companies, organizations or institutions in countries throughout the world. The course is designed to enhance global fluencies, professional competencies and career discernment. This is course is by application and the deadline is November 11. Learn more here: https://t.e2ma.net/click/ywz12k/u9aocmb/u92hiv

  • HIST 31001 Gold, War, Race, and Empire: Britain's Controversial War in South Africa 1899-1902

    • Instructor: Keith Surridge
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    The South African War pitted Britain, the region’s imperial power, against the Boers, who were white, Dutch (Afrikaans) speaking settlers based in two semi-independent republics, the Transvaal and Orange Free State, and also in the British territory of Cape Colony. Yet, it was not just ‘a white man’s war’. The conflict sucked in the majority African population often with devastating consequences. Furthermore, the war went beyond South Africa: Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders took part in order to defend the integrity of the British Empire and assert their own notions of nationhood. The course will explore the origins of the war, a contentious issue that exercised contemporaries and has maddened historians, especially the argument over whether Britain fought at the behest of the gold mining companies situated in Boer territory. The military aspects will be given due consideration: the early British defeats, the overwhelming British reaction and then the Boers’ resort to guerrilla warfare. This led to the British using a scorched earth policy, the recruitment of Africans by coercion and voluntary enlistment for both military and logistical work, and the introduction of concentration camps, where thousands of civilians, both Boer and African, died of disease, a policy that has been termed ‘methods of barbarism’. Overall, the course will look at a conflict that affected, in varying degrees, all the societies involved. It has shaped modern South Africa, especially with regard to race, and engendered myths that still resonate today. Consequently, students will be encouraged to unravel the myths and gain their own perspective on Britain’s largest and mostly costly colonial war.

  • POLS 30166 Hate Speech: Threats to States, Societies, and Peoples

    • Instructor: Emma Rosenberg
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    The weaponization of speech is constantly in the news. Today incendiary speech has unprecedented political repercussions. In this course, we will engage in deep readings of primarily political 20th and 21st century texts that have been accused of sowing hate. This course aims to provide students a safe analytical space to have deep encounters with texts that the general reader is discouraged from reading. While this course is not an exhaustive overview of all hate speech, it will offer students the opportunity to engage with primary sources seldom found in the classroom across the political spectrum. Together, we will explore what makes these texts dangerous, identify commonalities and pull out the ‘pedestrian’ aspect of many of them. The arc of the course will focus on developing a framework for analysis and coming to terms with the question: Is some speech simply too dangerous to permit?

  • ECON 30565 Health Economics

    • Instructor: Eva Dziadula
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course examines how economic analysis can be applied to various components of the health care system. Microeconomic theory is used to understand the operation of health care markets and the behavior of participants (consumers, insurers, physicians, and hospitals) in the health care industry. International comparisons and the role of the public sector are discussed.

  • AL 20001 Health Professions Toolkit: Building Core Competencies for the Health Professions

    • Instructor: Maureen Dawson
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course will allow students to explore the health professions and their respective national organizations, discern interests and motivations for the health professions, learn the core competencies and requirements needed for competitive admissions process, identify critical opportunities for clinical and volunteer opportunities, research, and co-curricular engagement, reflect on the unique strength of the liberal arts in the preparation for the health professions, establish timeline for testing and application processes, leverage resources from online, campus, and alumni resources, and build "toolkit" of necessary materials for admissions, application and interviewing.

  • ALHN 23195 How We Got Here

    • Instructor: Collin Meissner
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course is a close reading of Nathan Hill’s 2016 American novel "The Nix." In addition to reading the novel, students will watch several episodes of Ken Burns’ and Lynn Novick’s documentary "The Vietnam War," and Aaron Sorkin’s recent HBO film "The Trial of the Chicago Seven." Assignments will include a short class presentation with a written summary and a final paper (three pages). The Nix bridges monumental historical events and takes the reader from the suburban Midwest to New York City, from the 1968 riots that rocked Chicago and the Democratic National Convention, to the political climate that resulted in the election of President Donald Trump. Like all great narratives, the plot lines thread out, twist and wind down separate paths, cross each other and eventually knot together. This course will attempt to weave all these threads together and arrive at a clearer picture not only of the divisions that have galvanized contemporary American culture, but those things that tie us together and show us a path forward.

  • HESB 34111 Human Rights Accountability Act Clinic

    • Instructor: Thomas Kellenberg
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course will introduce students to the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act, and Executive Order 13818 and will require students to prepare jointly one case file submission identifying a foreign individual or entity that has engaged in (1) serious human rights abuses, or (2) significant acts of corruption. Working in a team, students will conduct open source research and will present their final work product to Human Rights First (a non-profit, nonpartisan international human rights organization) to be vetted for possible inclusion in HRF's consolidated submission to the State Department and Treasury Department requesting that Global Magnitsky Act sanctions be levied against the identified individual or entity.

  • PHIL 20658 Image, Embodiment and the Imagination

    University Requirement (2nd Philosophy): WKSP

    • Instructor: Nicholas Teh
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 36

    This is a course on the philosophy of representation in art and science. We will begin our investigation by pondering a puzzle about scientific representation that originates in an epistolary exchange between Einstein, Felix Klein and that august prophet of the power of “symmetry," Amelie Noether. To resolve our aporia, we will then embark on a journey that will take us from a discussion of “images” in Plato and the neo-Platonic tradition, to the exploration of the concepts of “idealization” and “embodiment” in a series of case studies (including the work of Giotto, Donatello, Veronese and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood) and culminating in a study of the appeal to the physical imagination that Galileo was trying to make in his famous “ship” thought experiment. We will conclude by discussing the aesthetics of scientific representation more generally.

  • GRED 68011 Inclusive Pedagogy: Designing Equitable Learning Experiences

    • Instructor: Alex Oxner
    • Notre Dame Learning
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    In the wake of the 2020 election, recent racial justice protests, and politicization of language surrounding COVID-19, it is critical for instructors to design intentional and inclusive learning environments in order to support a diverse range of students. In this introduction to inclusive pedagogy, students will read current educational theory while also learning practical strategies for fostering community within the classroom, interrogating unconscious bias, creating accessible course materials, exploring intersectional identities, diversifying course content, implementing social justice practices and more. This 1-credit course will run for two weeks beginning January 5. The course is for Graduate students only.

  • THEO 20207 In Dark Times

    University Requirement (2nd Theology): WKDT

    • Instructor: Ian Gerdon
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 72

    We can only live good lives, Hannah Arendt proposed, if we can make reasonable guesses about what the future will bring. But what happens when our expectations are upended? How can we live good lives if we have no clear sense of what tomorrow will bring? In this class, we will look at how Christians responded to the collapse of a civilization, a set of shared expectations that helped people choose good lives. We will focus on the early Middle Ages, when the Roman Empire collapsed, and on the 20th century’s wars and moral/metaphysical confusion. Thereby, we will attend to three issues: the theology of history or providence (i.e., God’s involvement in world history); the choices people make about how to live a good life (i.e., morality); and how we can understand the world and our choices within it. How, in short, do we live resilient lives in dark times?

  • ROFR 20201 Intermediate French I

    • Instructor: Azeb Haileselassie
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 16

    Intermediate French I is the first part of a two-semester language sequence intended to assist the Intermediate-level student in achieving a more proficient form of self-expression in French. By reviewing core grammatical concepts through carefully chosen cultural and literary texts, this class will incorporate a broad range of learning activities, including: oral communication skill developing activities; essay writing; film and reading reports.

  • ROSP 20201 Intermediate Spanish 1

    • Instructor: Andrea Topash-Rios
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 16

    This course is an intermediate, second-year language sequence course with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events and literary texts.

  • CSLC 73005 International Graduate Student Presentations

    • Instructor: Lisa Oglesbee
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course aids international graduate students in improving their academic and technical presentations. The course incorporates presentation assignments with opportunities for individualized feedback from the instructor and peers. Students examine issues related to presentation skills, the use of grammar for particular functions and intonation.

  • CSE 24111 Introduction to Arduino Programming

    • Instructor: Robert McLaughlin
    • College of Engineering
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    Learn embedded Arduino programming by building a basic game console using an Arduino Uno, Gamepad, small OLED display and buzzer and implementing a game of your own design. All required materials for the build will be provided as part of the course.

  • FTT 24235 Introduction to British Cinema

    UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENT: WKAR (Fine Arts)

    • Instructor: Clive Bloom, Alice Tyrell, Gemma Bencini, Kendal Jones
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    What is the British contribution to world cinema? Everyone's heard of Alfred Hitchcock, but what about Terence Davies or Ken Loach, two of the greatest film makers? Here we will study examples of the work of great directors and those whose names may not be obvious and look closely at their themes. We shall also study the subject through gender, ethnicity and class and theories of ideological conflict and social division. Britain has a small film industry. We tend to make films differently from Hollywood and the techniques we use differ too, from the ideas of lighting and cutting to the very scripts we embrace. Many British films are darker and more 'realistic' than Hollywood with overt political messages and without the stars of the Hollywood system. We have made some of the most influential films with the most prestigious directors and win plaudits around the world. This course concentrates on film (between 1929 and the present) from James Bond movies to Witchfinder General, from Blackmail to Time and the City to 'television' films such as Yasmin and from the avant-garde work of the counter culture to working-class realism. Introduction to British Cinema is aimed at students who wish to deepen and broaden their understanding of the British psyche through an understanding of the films we watch.

  • LLEA 10001 Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture

    • Instructor: Weibing Ye
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course is intended for complete beginners who want to get a quick “bite” of Chinese language and culture. It will cover an introduction to the sound, writing and grammatical systems of Chinese language, gives insight into ancient versus modern Chinese culture and society, as well as introducing some basic conversational Mandarin Chinese over the course. For those who are interested in further developing their competence in Chinese language and culture after completion of this course, they can take Elementary Chinese I in spring or First Year Chinese I in fall.

  • FYS 10415 Introduction to Health Science Professions

    • Instructor: Laura Flynn
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 96

    This course is a 1-credit seminar featuring selected speakers, most with B.S. or B.A degrees from Notre Dame, who are employed in a variety of health science professions. The online presentations will expose students to the paths and job responsibilities of several different health care professionals. The speaker series is intended to assist students in their decision making process of whether or not to pursue a healthcare profession while better preparing them to be successful, both personally and academically, during their college years and beyond. We will also read and discuss two books related to health care.

  • LLEA 10111 Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture

    • Instructor: Naoki Fuse
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course will focus on the Japanese language in its cultural context. The first half of the course will explore the use of the language in Japanese society from Nara period (the 8th century) to the present. The second half of the course will examine essential characteristics of the language both from the linguistic and cultural points of view. No prior knowledge of the language is required. This is an excellent introductory course for those who are interested in taking a beginning-level Japanese language course. Those who are already learning Japanese will deepen their cultural understanding of the language.

  • MATH 20180 (CRN 33030) Introduction to Mathematical Writing and History

    • Instructor: Brian Mulholland
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 2
    • Max Seats: 16

    Students will experience a panoramic view of mathematics by considering mathematics in its historical context. The course will include a look at Greek mathematics, Islamic mathematics, Early and Late European mathematics, and conclude with a look at modern mathematics. This course will also showcase many of the contributions of women and minorities in the field of mathematics, such as Al-Khwarizmi, Sophie Germain, Srinivasa Ramanujan, and Maryam Mirzakhani. Students will also have the opportunity to develop the technical skill of using LaTex, a document preparation system for high-quality typesetting.

  • MATH 20180 (CRN 33410) Introduction to Mathematical Writing and History

    UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENT: WRIT (Writing Intensive)

    • Instructor: Brian Mulholland
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 16

    Students will experience a panoramic view of mathematics by considering mathematics in its historical context. The course will include a look at Greek mathematics, Islamic mathematics, Early and Late European mathematics, and conclude with a look at modern mathematics. This course will also showcase many of the contributions of women and minorities in the field of mathematics, such as Al-Khwarizmi, Sophie Germain, Srinivasa Ramanujan, and Maryam Mirzakhani. Students will also have the opportunity to develop the technical skill of using LaTex, a document preparation system for high-quality typesetting.

  • PHIL 20101 Introduction to Philosophy

    University Requirement (1st Philosophy): WKFP

    • Instructor: David Cory
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 48

    The philosophical impulse is the desire to know, and this desire is shared by everyone. But while the desire might be common in our experience, it is hard to explain exactly what it is or what it is a desire for, because it is hard to say exactly what knowledge is and what knowledge is about. Philosophy 20101 begins by asking why the thirst for knowledge is such a pressing concern and just what it is we're so desperate to know. Is this desire our most fundamental desire or is it motivated by deeper desires, e.g. to prolong life, to alleviate suffering or to increase wealth or pleasure? Are truth claims inherently manipulative? How is what we believe shaped by our feelings and vice versa, and does this interplay between the head and the heart undermine the reliability of our knowledge? Do we desire to know everything equally or are there especially satisfying forms of knowledge, e.g. knowledge of our own history, or interpersonal knowledge (of each other or of God) or knowledge of scientific theory? Ultimately how one explains the desire to know shapes one's substantive views on how we should live together. This course will seek to introduce students to the political and ethical theories which arise from the various attempts to explain what it is we are seeking in seeking knowledge. The course will focus on key primary texts in the history of philosophy (with special attention to Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Locke, and Rousseau).

  • ROPO 33300 Introduction to Portuguese and Brazilian Culture through Cinema and Music

    • Instructor: Ana Fauri
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course examines 20th and 21st century Portuguese and Brazilian culture through cinema and music. As we explore the artistic achievements of Portuguese and Brazilian writers, musicians and filmmakers over the last one hundred years, students will examine topics such as social inequalities and power struggle, the importance of soccer, carnival, music and religion, as well as major historical events that have impacted popular cultural productions in Brazil and Portugal. Our goal is to evaluate how films and music portray the culture of these countries, and to discuss how artistic manifestations offer a reference or a different perspective on the interpretation of the society and the culture of Brazilians and Portuguese. Conducted in English.

  • PS, CSC 23000, 23003 Introduction to Poverty Studies

    • Instructor: Connie Mick
    • Center for Social Concerns
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    Mahatma Ghandi said that poverty is the worst form of violence. Jesus said that the poor will always be with us and that they will inherit the kingdom of God. Ronald Reagan said we fought the war on poverty and poverty won. Lawyer Bryan Stevenson said the opposite of poverty is justice. In this course, we will address that enduring question: Why are people poor? We will take an interdisciplinary look at poverty to better understand the forces that maintain poverty and the forces that resist it. We will connect with community partners at the Center for the Homeless and other agencies to learn about advocacy work that protects people experiencing poverty and helps develop policies that prevent poverty. We will explore poverty through statistics and stories — the facts and the lived experience of people in poverty. This framework will help guide our journey: -Definitions. What is poverty? -Causes. Why are people poor? -Consequences. Who is poor? -Privilege. Who isn’t poor? -Rhetoric. How does the media represent poverty? -Solutions. What should we do about poverty? We will consider incarceration, immigration, employment, housing, health, education, public policy, private service and much more to better understand this complex issue. By the end of this course, you should have a sense of the history of poverty and of how poverty could become history. Some seats will be reserved for declared Poverty Studies minors, but we will also open this to all students for the first time.

  • PSY 10000 Introduction to Psychology

    University Requirement (Social Science): WKSS

    • Instructor: Bradley Gibson
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 48

    Psychology is the science of mind, brain and behavior. In this course, we will undertake the ambitious and exciting goal of surveying the entire field of psychology. We will discuss the tools and methods used by psychologists, and we will apply these methods as seek answers to questions such as: Can we read minds with brain imaging? Is perception an accurate representation of the external world? What do my dreams mean? How can I study most effectively? Why do I forget things? Why do adolescents and young adults engage in risky behavior? How can I be happy? What is mental illness and how can it be treated?

  • ENGL 20215 Introduction to Shakespeare

    UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENT: WKLI (Literature)

    • Instructor: Arnaud Zimmern
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course investigates Shakespeare plays - Much Ado About Nothing, Midsummer Night's Dream, and Othello - on the stage and the page. We will give detailed attention to core philosophical, theatrical, literary, and political questions in each play, and consider the contemporary global encounter with Shakespeare in multiple literary/linguistic traditions and media forms (film, graphic novel, digital media). No previous experience with Shakespeare is required.

  • FIN 20000 Investing Case Studies

    • Instructor: Colin Jones
    • Mendoza College of Business
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 96

    This 1-credit course will offer students of any major and class year the opportunity to participate in case studies and interactive live sessions with leading investment management firms. A different industry practitioner will lead each live session to explain the methodology, reasoning and perspective that informed his or her professional opinion. The learning objectives of the course include gaining a real-world perspective on investment management, thereby bridging the gap between theory and practice and advancing the process of career discernment in the field of investing.

  • THEO 20830 Islam and Christian Theology

    University Requirement (2nd Theology): WKDT

    • Instructor: Gabriel Reynolds
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 72

    Islam and Christian Theology meets the 2nd Theology requirement. It addresses the relationship between Christianity and Islam. According to standard Islamic teaching, Jesus was not God, not a savior and did not die on the cross. Instead, he was a Muslim prophet who predicted the coming of Muhammad. Muslims, in other words, have something to say to Christians: that Jesus was a Muslim and that Muhammad is a true prophet sent to the entire world. In this course, we will listen to how Muslims explain and express this idea, examine how Christians have responded through the centuries and ask how Christians today might fruitfully promote dialogue with Islam. No prior background in Arabic or Islam is required for this course.

  • ROIT 64050 Italian Graduate Reading

    • Instructor: Katie Boyle
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 16

    This online course is intended as an intensive study of Italian grammar and syntax for graduate students in the humanities or sciences interested in gaining reading proficiency in Italian. Designed with reading for research purposes as the central aim, we will focus written work on skills graduate students would need to conduct a portion of their research in the target language, such as: scanning a text, reading an article or chapter in the primary language, translating short excerpts for citation purposes, and being able to contextualize readings and summarize content within an argument. Students will work their way through the grammar and will also focus on building vocabulary through reading and weekly targeted vocabulary lessons, in addition to building a field-specific vocabulary list throughout the course. Our final project will allow students to work on a text from their own field, chosen in consultation with the instructor. No previous knowledge of Italian is assumed or required for this course. Successful completion of this course means that a student is exempt from the graduate reading exam offered by the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. This course if for Graduate students only.

  • ROIT 23300 Let's Talk Italian

    • Instructor: Lesley Marcantonio
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This mini-course in Italian offers both informal and structured conversation practice. Conversation about Italian culture, society, art, music and film will be based on authentic materials. This course meets for two one-hour sessions per week for group discussions on contemporary issues and with guest speakers. Conducted in Italian. Keep up your Italian over this long break!

  • ROSP 23300 Let's Talk Spanish

    • Instructor: Catherine Brix
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 2
    • Max Seats: 18

    In this course, students will continue practicing Spanish language skills through sustained conversation in a class designed to maintain and improve achieved speaking and listening comprehension proficiencies in the language. Students will also be exposed to a variety of celebrated films from the Spanish-speaking world, which will serve as the basis for class discussions. Students will gain cultural competence about Latin American and Spanish cinema, improve conversational Spanish skills and learn how to express informed judgments and opinions about their preferences and cinematic interests in dialogue with their peers. This course will be conducted in Spanish.

  • KSGA 20997 LifeDesign: Mindsets, Skillsets and Habits for a More Joyful and Purposeful Life

    • Instructor: Steve Reifenberg
    • Keough School of Global Affairs
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 72

    LifeDesign is an opportunity to shape your life’s journey by developing mindsets and putting into practice skillsets and habits, for a more joyful and purposeful life. This experimental workshop does not assume to give you the “right” answer. Rather, together we will go on a journey exploring science (from psychology, behavioral science, and neuroscience) that you can use in your own life. You will also have multiple pathways to try out practical ideas and to reflect on your own life. This model has been built collaboratively with students on questions that they feel are important. These include designing your life, exploring purpose, practicing gratitude, unleashing creativity, becoming more mindful, and embracing a growth mindset. The class will be dynamic, moving regularly between activities with the full group, in pairs and working with facilitators in LifeDesign Teams of six students organized to try out these ideas. The class will be organized into a dozen LifeDesign Teams each accompanied by a facilitator. Here's a link to the course website with more details including a syllabus and a two-minute intro video: https://lifedesignnd.squarespace.com/

  • LLRO 13186 Literature University Seminar: Dante's Divine Comedy

    University Requirement: USEM (University Seminar)

    • Instructor: Vittorio Hosle
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    Dante, whose 700th anniversary of death we are celebrating in 2021, created with the "Divine Comedy", not only one of the greatest works of world literature but also a philosophical and theological masterpiece that gave perfect expression to the medieval version of Catholicism. We will read the work in the translation of Robert and Jean Hollander and explore the interweaving of its literary, philosophical and theological dimensions, trying to grasp and evaluate his moral vision of the universe.

  • IIPS 30103 Madrasa Discourses

    • Instructor: Ebrahim Moosa and Josh Lupo
    • Keough School of Global Affairs
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course will provide a deeper introduction to the Madrasa Discourses (MD) project for students who applied to participate in the project’s virtual Winter Intensive. Madrasa Discourses provides scholars of Islam in India and Pakistan with the theological and methodological frameworks to engage modern concerns. Students who applied will spend time in December observing and participating in several MD classes on lived religion and engaging in small-group, intercultural dialogue with the Madrasa Discourses scholars. In this January course, students who desire to continue can dig deeper into the peace studies concepts that distinguish the MD approach and continue their dialogue with cohorts of Muslim theologians, both men, and women. The course will engage the participating students directly in facilitated intercultural and interfaith dialogues, offering an opportunity to reflect on questions of tradition and modernity, hermeneutics and commentary on Islamic law, and openly consider transnational and pedagogical power dynamics at play in the Madrasa Discourses model. To learn more about student participation in the MD project, visit the Kroc Institute website at https://kroc.nd.edu/undergraduate/beyond-the-classroom/. To learn more about the Madrasa Discourses project itself, visit https://keough.nd.edu/madrasa-discourses-project. The deadline to apply for this course is December 7, 2020.

  • ROSP 43580 Mexican Cinema

    • Instructor: Joshua Lund
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    Mexican cinema has been one of the most vibrant, influential national film cultures of the past century. This seminar will introduce the student to the rich history of this art through the viewing and analysis of six essential films: Maria Candelaria (1943), Los olvidados (1950), El lugar sin limites (1977), Amores perros (2000), Luz silenciosa (2007) and Roma (2018). Alongside their aesthetic innovations, these films will also provide a window into transformations in Mexican culture, society and politics. Class time (4 hours per week) will be introduced with a very brief lecture and then dedicated to a discussion of the assigned film. The language of instruction is English. All students, all majors, all levels are welcome.

  • CLGR 20001, 60201 Minding the Gap with Greek Prose

    • Instructor: C. Baron & A. Tagliabue
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 2
    • Max Seats: 18

    This two-credit course will provide students the opportunity to "bridge the gap" between fall and spring semesters by reading small portions of Greek prose texts, in a structured setting with regular Classics faculty. We will read passages from Plato, Xenophon, Lysias and Lucian. The class will meet for 15 live sessions over four weeks and will consist of translating Greek texts, reviewing grammar and syntax and discussing stylistic features. Texts will be provided to students beforehand in PDF format. Students will be asked to prepare to translate certain segments of the text for each session. On occasion, we will spend class time translating passages at first sight as well. Assessment will consist of written translation assignments, to be turned in at the end of each week, as well as preparation and participation.

  • POLS 34530 Modern Political Leadership: The Powers of the US President and the UK Prime Minister Compared

    • Instructor: Richard Heffernan
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 40

    This course provides students with an insight into the study of contemporary political leadership using comparative politics tools to contrast the U.S. president with the U.K. prime minister. It will explore the impacts of the varied environments within which presidents and prime ministers operate, namely political systems and structures, historical processes and party and electoral contexts. And it will examine the ways in which the interplay of events, political ideas, public and electoral opinion, interest group activity, forms of political communications and the mainstream news media help enable or else constrain political leaders.

  • CBE 44605, 64605 Molecular Thermodynamics, Modeling, and Simulation

    • Instructor: Jonathan Whitmer
    • College of Engineering
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This is a 1-credit hour course in molecular modeling and the thermodynamics relevant for its interpretation at the advanced undergraduate and early graduate level. It is a focused but not comprehensive introduction to molecular-level modeling for undergraduates and graduate students involved in computational research, along with others who might be interested in developing chemical intuition and exercising their programming skills. Students will be introduced to the essential theory and practices in molecular level modeling, including classical and quantum mechanical simulations and their interpretation.

  • CSC, GRED 68010 Moment to See/Competence to Act: Fostering Social Responsibility and Justice through Higher Education

    • Instructor: Jay Brandenberger
    • Center for Social Concerns
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This interdisciplinary seminar for graduate students from all disciplines responds to the current ethical moment in higher education: Both Pope Francis and Science magazine have called this “a moment to see.” What are the social responsibilities of universities? How may we address challenges such as COVID-19, racial injustice and political divisions? How may universities, including Notre Dame, contribute to forming a new normal that fosters equity and justice? The course will engage such questions in a flexible format during the Winter Session. The course will encourage students to examine the implications of their disciplines for the common good, to imagine and build plans for future professional actions. How might you integrate knowledge of empathy, design thinking, diversity, human flourishing, community development and justice into your work? The seminar will be enhanced by the integration of guest speakers and by relevant podcasts and digital media. Students will tailor their own learning plans according to disciplinary interests. Join us in this creative opportunity to respond with courage and hope. Note: the course will also fulfill many of the requirements of the Graduate Certificate in Community Engagement and Public Scholarship: https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/content/graduate-certificate-community-engagement-and-public-scholarship

  • WR 13300 Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Reading, Writing, and Communicating in Digital Spaces

    University Requirement: WRRH-Writing & Rhetoric

    • Instructor: N. McLaughlin & D. Zurro
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 16

    Because researching and composing arguments is increasingly linked to technological tools, multimedia sections of Writing and Rhetoric teach students how to make the most of a wide array of resources. From standard tools, such as Google Docs, to more powerful web-based tools and publications, students in multimedia sections use textual, audio, and visual technology to its fullest while exploring the unique opportunities and challenges of composing in the 21st century. Our course combines traditional sessions with hands-on studio sessions, where students will be guided in class through the steps successful writers take as they craft their own texts. Students will learn strategies and skills which are transferable to writing across academic, personal and public contexts. While students do not need any prior technological skills, they should be ready to learn many of these skills over the course of the semester.

  • MUS 20160 Music in Film

    • Instructor: John Liberatore
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course explores the soundtrack in American cinema, both contemporary and historical. The course will include a mix of small-group discussion and full-group lectures and demonstrations, as well as private viewing of films (with possibility of group viewing). Students will present a term paper on a film of their choosing at the end of the session and complete shorter guided assignments throughout the term. Film synthesizes many forms of art and communication into a whole greater than the sum of its parts. Studying music in film raises our threshold between liminal and subliminal forms of rhetoric and communication. It makes us more observant, more sympathetic and more aware of the forces that shape our understanding of art and media. Therefore, study of music in film belongs at the core of the humanities.

  • AME 30391 Nanomaterials Surface Modifications Strategies

    • Instructor: Prakash Nallathamby
    • College of Engineering
    • Credit Hours: 2
    • Max Seats: 24

    The course is targeted at the undergraduate (sophomore to senior) student level. It will be useful to students interested in cross-disciplinary R&D, materials science and engineering and innovations in developing a toolbox of methods to use in optimizing formulations for advanced materials and applications. Why modify nanomaterials surfaces? The surface modifications of nanomaterials' primary goal are to alter the surface to improve nanomaterials' compatibility within a dispersion matrix until they achieve their end goal. What is surface modification? How can we modify surfaces? We touch on surface energetics, physical methods, chemical methods, coupling chemistries, high energy treatments, wet chemical treatments, grafting and end-user applications (e.g., 3D-printing, and diagnostics). This course covers the basics of nanomaterials synthesis, surface modifications and bioconjugations and introduces new concepts in tuning the final applications of nanomaterials.

  • POLS 34533 Nationalism in the Celtic U.K.

    • Instructor: Julianna Füzesi
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    Today's United Kingdom looks like an increasingly fragile union of four different nations. Long governed by a dominant England, the Celtic regions of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are now challenging London with their confident national identities. These range from growing assertiveness in Wales down to outright secessionism in Scotland and Northern Ireland. This introductory comparative politics class will survey their individual histories, nationalisms and politics. We will do so by understanding how these nations each became part of the union, what they experienced before regaining limited self-government through devolution and how they now shape their likely future within (and possibly outside of) the U.K.

  • CSC 45001 NEAR Science Workshop

    • Instructor: Nancy Michael
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 48

    This one-credit course is a continuation of CBL/CBR work largely from my fall semester Developmental Neuroscience course but will hopefully also include other students who are McNeal Fellows through the CSC and students who have participated in SSLPs. The goals are (generally) to develop strategies for iterative evaluation and development of NEAR (neuroscience, epigenetics, adverse childhood experiences, resilience) science efforts from previous semesters and to develop community coalition strategies, engagement and planning surrounding NEAR Science engagement, trauma-informed care and Self-Healing Communities.

  • CSC, AFST 23000 Open Wide Our Hearts: Understandings of Self, Race, and the Common Good in the Year 2020

    • Instructor: Yvette Rodriguez & Melissa Bonnichsen
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    In light of the recently elevated conversation around race and society in the U.S. throughout 2020, this course creates intentional space for students to engage the current conversation of self-understanding, race and society through the lens of Catholic Social Thought and Pope Francis' most recent encyclical Fratelli Tutti: Brother/Sisterhood and Social Friendship. Topics covered: identity, society and race, racial justice, active citizenship, CST.

  • PHIL 20640 Philosophy of Mental Illness

    UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENT (WKSP): 2ND PHILOSOPHY

    • Instructor: Ellen Lehet
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    Mental illness is an increasingly important yet sadly misunderstood topic in our society. This course is designed to help students analyze the phenomenon of mental illness in a philosophical way. The two main questions driving the course are how should we think about mental illness, and what obligations do we have regarding mental illness. Students will be expected to read, discuss, and develop their thoughts regarding these topics. Grades will include one major research paper, as well as minor presentations leading up to that paper.

  • CHEM 46495 Photochemistry: From Basics to Applications

    • Instructor: Aliaksandra Lisouskaya
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    The main goal of this course is to acquire knowledge of modern theories of photochemistry, the diversity of photochemical reactions of organic compounds, as well as their applications. This course covers the interplay between light and molecules – from fundamental principles of photochemistry to cutting-edge applications in chemistry, the biomedical field and material science. Critical concepts in photochemistry and the complexity of organic photochemistry will be reduced to a set of simple paradigms so that a student can gain an effective understanding. Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry.

  • MUS 20400 Piano Journeys: Modern and Contemporary Keyboard Literature

    • Instructor: Daniel Schlosberg
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    Explore the wonderfully wide world of 20th and 21st century keyboard music. The focus of this music literature course will be more cultural/historical than technical, digging into topics such as: minimalism, appropriation, alternative instruments (accordion, melodica) and many more. There will also be intentional inclusion of BIPOC composers, in addition to Schoenberg, Ligeti and Cage. Prerequisite: Theory I or permission of instructor. The course grade will be based on attendance, participation, and several short listening-response written assignments. There will not be any quizzes or exams.

  • IIPS, MGA 50100, 60732 Policy Writing for International Mediation

    • Instructor: Laurie Nathan
    • Keough School of Global Affairs
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 16

    The course covers the skills of mediation policy advocacy and drafting; building partnerships with policymakers in the United Nations and regional organizations; the politics of international mediation; and the relationship between policy and practice.

  • ENGL 24238 Politics and Sex in Shakespeare’s Plays: Page to Stage

    • Instructor: Boika Sokolova
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    At the center of this course are two Shakespeare plays: Julius Caesar, one of Shakespeare’s most political texts, and Measure for Measure, a play of ‘dark corners’, where issues of justice, faith, politics and sex are inextricably mixed. Stage versions of the plays will offer an experience of the contemporary, immersive and expressive styles, characteristic of European theatre. The principal aim is to invite students of various backgrounds to the world of Shakespeare, both through the briefly outlined original context of his work and through the living contemporary environment of theatre. Hence, the focus alternates between reading the text and ‘reading’ performance. We will consider: how the plays are mediated through performance; how the productions connect with the concerns of their audience; how performances articulate modern unease about the extent of power and its abuse; how they open spaces for the voices of the powerless; how they re/imagine the roles of women and the disenfranchised; how the different elements of a performance contribute to the ‘meaning’ of a production.

  • EE 27299 Practical Radio Communications

    • Instructor: S. Howard, C. Manning
    • College of Engineering
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course is open to anyone interested in obtaining an amateur radio license from the FCC while learning the fundamental principles of radio communications. No prior engineering experience is necessary. Practical concepts explaining radio operation will be emphasized, along with introducing the basic low-level theoretical physics and engineering principles of how radios work. At the end of the course, students will have the option to sit for a remote licensing exam to obtain a license from the FCC. This course is given in collaboration with the Notre Dame Radio Society and students on the new IrishSat team developing Notre Dame’s first CubeSat satellite.

  • PHYS 30020 Practicing Programming

    • Instructor: Keith Davis
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course offers students with beginning to intermediate knowledge of Python an opportunity to practice writing better code. Students will treat programming similarly to a writing skill: Code will be evaluated for clarity, reusability and generality rather than simple functionality. Simple programs are a solution to a single problem, but in time, novice programmers will find their code needs to do more. This course offers students a chance to transition to better code through practice, and will treat projects as the construction of valuable tools that are to be reused rather than one-off assignments. Activities in the course will include discussion of the elements of programming style, and students will create programming projects that execute those principles. Projects will be submitted as drafts and revised several times to improve implementation of the principles of coding style, based on peer and instructor feedback. The instructor will also introduce advanced features of Python that can help make code simpler to edit and revise, based on student interest and skill level. The course is designed to be valuable for a wide range of student knowledge but is designed for students who are comfortable programming in Python. This course is appropriate for graduate or undergraduate students with appropriate Python Skills.

  • HIST 30990 Race and Reproduction in American History

    • Instructor: Emily Smith
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course is an exploration of the history of race and reproduction in America from the colonial period to the present day. We will use traditional and creative ways of historical analysis to study race and reproduction, as well as issues of gender, sexuality, birth control, abortion, and eugenics. We will learn how scholars have used innovative source bases, methods, and interpretive frameworks to uncover the stories of people who challenge and uphold expectations of race, reproduction, and gender. For example, students will learn about topics in the history of birth control, like early folk medicines and prophylactics, 20th century eugenics, and mid-20th century birth control controversies. We will also learn about anti-sexual assault activism from 19th century anti-lynching campaigns to the Civil Rights movement to #MeToo. This course will give students opportunities to analyze primary sources, identify important shifts and figures in American history, and produce an original final project to share with your classmates. Students should expect some lecture, but a focus on group work and class discussion. No background in history is required.

  • ROPO 43810 Race and Social Inequality in Brazil

    • Instructor: Marcio Bahia
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    In this dynamic and interactive course, students will develop their oral skills by discussing current issues and hot topics in Brazil and beyond through Brazilian news outlets. TV news shows, newspaper websites and online portals will be used to discuss contemporary Brazilian politics, economy, society, entertainment and much more! Pre-requisite: Portuguese Intermediate 1 (ROPO20201).

  • AFST, IIPS 30683, 30203 Race in World Politics

    • Instructor: Bernard Forjwuor
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 16

    Prompted by new insights in critical international political studies, this course seeks to engage with new scholarly activities that have sought to bring back the analyses of race and racism into discussions of global politics. This course employs normative, critical race and decolonial approaches to study world politics in its inherent complexity. It will create an engaging environment for students to think creatively and critically about the underlying structures of oppression, imperialism and racism that routinely frame engagements with current global political events. Specifically, we will discuss how particular understandings of race and racism shape contemporary scholarship in international politics and also inform national and international legal and governmental practices. Questions of concern in this course will include, among others things, the impact of racism on Western understanding of itself and its political projects in the world, the ways systems of oppression are folded into the IMF’s and World Bank’s aid regimes, the different articulations of non-Western subjectivities (characterized as Third World, poor, corrupt, etc.) in world affairs, the changing patterns of capital and labor mobility where immigration policies have redefined the human/foreigner as a threat/drain on resources/disposable, as well as the ways environmental degradation (dumping of waste in Africa) affirm new kinds of cultural/political imperialism.

  • CLLA 20001, 60201 Reading Latin Prose

    • Instructor: Luca Grillo
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 2
    • Max Seats: 18

    This course is designed to help students to take advanced Latin courses in the spring. We will focus on original readings from Livy and Younger Pliny and learn about the mythical foundation of Rome, the war against Hannibal, the eruption of mount Vesuvius and the Roman persecutions of Christians.

  • RU 40001 Reading Russian

    • Instructor: David Gasperetti
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course helps students improve their reading proficiency in Russian by developing strategies for efficiently deciphering sophisticated texts, reviewing grammar and exploring the art of translating from Russian into English. The reading list consists of works and excerpts from the canon of Russian literature as well as some non-fiction.

  • RE 30760 Real Estate ProForma I

    • Instructor: Roger Staiger
    • Mendoza College of Business
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    The general course objectives are to introduce students to real estate financial modeling. Leaning Objectives: 1) Learning to construct a 1–5 unit multifamily pro forma 2) Understanding and use for 1–5 unit multifamily pro forma in underwriting 3) Understanding the distinction between debt and equity and the nature of financial leverage and its use in real estate 4) Developing basic investment briefing for investor presentation(s). A basic understanding of Excel is recommended as a starting point. The course will cover more advanced Excel skills required for the development of the pro forma.

  • HIST 30984 Reconstruction and Its End

    • Instructor: Heather Lane
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course demonstrates how Reconstruction and the period directly after Reconstruction provide keys to understanding modern American history, culture, and politics. It covers a relatively brief period of time (less than forty years) at a level accessible to students with no background in history. It presents history—this specific history—as a vital and living part of our daily lives and shows how history frames our world and our experiences. We will cover the period from the end of the Civil War to the late nineteenth century, as well as the way historians and the public have understood this period from its end through to the present day. We will read a mix of historical documents and modern histories, the equivalent of about a chapter per class meeting. As a case study, it gives students a chance to pick up a new perspective and a new set of research and critical reading skills in a quick, low-key environment, while providing history majors, minors and enthusiasts with the option of doing a deeper dive with the option of doing independent research instead of the (short) final paper. A central focus of this course is the history of work for and against social justice around race in America. It shows how the racism of the Reconstruction Era continues to shape our public life and demonstrates how the end of Reconstruction and the withdrawal of federal protection for Black people in the South helped set the course for American racial politics going forward. In doing so, it also provides an example of how to think historically about modern issues and how to identify when and how historical myths are being built and perpetuated.

  • ESS 43643 Re-Seeing and Reflecting on Teaching

    • Instructor: Kati Macaluso
    • Institute for Educational Initiatives
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    One of the complicating factors in the formation of new teachers has to do with what scholars of teacher education have coined the “apprenticeship of observation:” the fact that anyone who enters the teaching force has spent approximately 14,000 hours across 13 years, as students, watching teachers work. This one-credit seminar, designed for prospective teachers and those interested in teaching, relies on focused observation of video-recorded lessons from actual K-12 classrooms, live conversation with current K-12 teachers in the field and reflection to make visible the less apparent — and often quite comple x— “stuff” of teaching, like student engagement, learning and classroom culture. Throughout the course, prospective teachers will develop a reflective framework that conditions them to know where and how to focus their professional development as they enter into more advanced course and field work.

  • FTT, GSC, EURO 30134, 30674, 30008 Revisiting "Rebecca"

    • Instructor: Susan Ohmer
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    Daphne du Maurier’s novel "Rebecca," published in 1938, has frequently appeared on lists of the best British fiction and continues to inspire film and television adaptations, most recently, the October 2020 Netflix release starring Lily James, Armie Hammer, and Kristin Scott Thomas. The novel as well as its media adaptations, evoke multiple genres: Rebecca is at once a romantic Cinderella story, a melodrama, a Gothic thriller, a murder mystery and an exploration of the psychological nuances of female power and sexuality. This 1-credit winter session course will explore du Maurier’s novel; Alfred Hitchcock’s 1940 film; radio and television adaptations produced in the U.S., the U.K. and India; the 1983 opera; and the current Netflix production to assess how these narratives have spoken to issues of sexuality, class and gender across multiple cultures and time periods. Class meetings built around synchronous discussions will analyze the material, social, cultural and ideological factors involved in adapting a narrative into different media frameworks.

  • PHIL 24632 Robot Ethics

    University Requirement (2nd Philosophy): WKSP

    • Instructor: Mark Bourgeois
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 60

    Robots or "autonomous systems" play an ever-increasing role in many areas, from weapons systems and driverless cars to health care and consumer services. As a result, it is ever more important to ask whether it makes any sense to speak of such systems' behaving ethically and how we can build into their programming what some call "ethics modules." After a brief technical introduction to the field, this course will approach these questions through contemporary philosophical literature on robot ethics and through popular media.

  • RU 10002, 60003 Russian Conversation

    • Instructor: Melissa Miller
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 12

    This course is for Russian language students of all levels. It will focus on conversation, supplemented by viewings and discussion of Russian news, Russian music videos, cartoons and clips of movies and television. Since this course focuses on oral communication skills, there will be no written homework or readings outside of class time.

  • ARCH 43202 Saving a Community's Historic Buildings

    • Instructor: Todd Zeiger
    • School of Architecture
    • Credit Hours: 2
    • Max Seats: 18

    The course provides a project-based community engagement model focused on the preservation of historic buildings. The project will integrate preservation philosophies, programs, financial incentives, project research, documentation and design through the lenses of private, non-profit and governmental roles. During the session, students will implement a process utilizing a threatened historic building in their community or as part of a team to develop skills and understanding needed to develop an advocacy, business and and architectural designs that could be utilized to save and rehabilitate/restore a historic building. Fourth, fifth and graduate-level School of Architecture students and students interested in historic preservation enrolled in business, law, anthropology or engineering are encouraged. The course will involve three synchronous meetings each week supplemented with asynchronous learning modules and applied research and project development.

  • PHIL 20627 Science and Catholicism

    University Requirement (2nd Philosophy); WKSP

    • Instructor: John O'Callaghan
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 36

    A historical and philosophical examination of the relations, if there are any, between science and religion with particular reference to the Catholic intellectual tradition. Through the use of historical materials the course will attempt to isolate and examine philosophical difficulties that might be thought to obtained between the claims made by Christian revelation and various scientific theories about features of the world. Emphasis will be placed upon distinctive ways in which the intellectual tradition of the Catholic church has faced the issues raised. Figures to be considered may include Augustine, Aquinas, Galileo, Bellarmine, Darwin, Huxley, Dawkins, Newman, Leroy, Zahm, LeMaitre and Hawking, as well as others. Topics to be discussed are Language, Meaning, and Revelation, the Nature of Science, Theory, and Hypothesis, Evolution, the Big Bang, Soul and Body, Creation versus Making, Providence and Chance.

  • WR 60500 Scientific Writing for Graduate Students

    • Instructor: Michelle Marvin
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course offers graduate students in the sciences and engineering a focused study of the conventions of scientific writing, fostering a clearer understanding of what constitutes good writing in these fields. Through close analysis of published scientific papers, guest lectures from faculty in the sciences and engineering and focused writing activities in a workshop environment, students will hone their writing skills and make a clear plan for their continued development as writers in their home disciplines.

  • CDT, ITAO 30040, 24321 Silicon Valley: Technology, Careers, Culture

    • Instructor: Sarv Devaraj
    • Notre Dame California
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 48

    This course is designed to introduce students to the vibrant culture of innovation, emerging technologies, and career opportunities in the technology industry and in Silicon Valley. Industry experts from innovative companies will present on topics across a wide spectrum of functional areas such as - new product idea generation and design, funding, operations and scaling, marketing, data science, and other topics. While the course is open to all students, those attending/planning for the Silicon Valley Semester offered by ND California are encouraged to sign up.

  • ACMS 34617 SQL for Data Science

    • Instructor: Alan Huebner
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 36

    Structured Query Language (SQL) is the standard and most widely used language for accessing and manipulating data in databases. Students will learn fundamental commands for filtering records, selecting variables and merging data tables. These skills will be applied in the context of solving statistical problems in which students are presented with a research question, use SQL to obtain the appropriate data set and then use the data to create an appropriate visualization and/or conduct a statistical inference to answer the question.

  • AL 21000 Stories of Power and Diversity: Inside Museums, Archives, and Collecting

    • Instructor: R. Bohlmann & E. Hosselkus
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    What do the paintings and sculptures in museums and the manuscripts and antique books in archives tell us about our collective past? What do they tell us about how value, importance, and worth have been ascribed across time? As users of these cultural collections, how might we address inequities and silences within them? The first half of this 1-credit course provides a lightning introduction to the history of cultural collecting and its many issues. Through the Zoom window students will apply a critical gaze to the collections held in our campus repositories – the Snite Museum of Art, Rare Books and Special Collections and University Archives – and in museums and archives beyond the Notre Dame campus. In the second half of the course, students will create a single online exhibition around the theme of diversity using our campus collections. This exhibition will be published on the Hesburgh Library’s Digital Exhibitions and Collections page and students will be given curatorial credit for their work. The course schedule will begin with seminar-style meetings and move to individual work, one-on-one sessions with instructors, peer review and project evaluation.

  • CE 30267 Structural Timber Design

    • Instructor: Kevin Walsh
    • College of Engineering
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course provides a foundation of wood design concepts for the aspiring wood builders and designers of tomorrow. Through hands-on design tasks projects and lectures, students will get an in-depth knowledge of the engineering capabilities of wood and wood products. Students will be able to describe and apply design techniques for individual wood components, including beams, columns and connections, using engineered wood composites and conventional lumber products. The course additionally develops technical competencies essential for practicing engineers when conceptualizing systems for real-world projects include detailing for constructability and robustness. Contemporary issues, case studies and modern tools of practice (codes, standards and potentially commercial software) are integrated throughout the course.

  • HIST 20420 Tale of One City: Piecing together London’s Past

    • Instructor: Alice Tyrell & Charlotte Parkyn
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 48

    This course has been designed to introduce students to London’s history as a global city and some of its many historic buildings, museums and diverse neighbourhoods. Inspired by the in-person "Inside London" class usually offered in London, this online iteration will make use of digital presentations of original source material to introduce students to London’s history at a moment when physical exploration is limited. Simultaneously, the course will explore the idea of history, not as a simple set of facts about “what happened in the past,” but as a changing interpretive discipline, rooted in the evaluation and interpretation of primary source material.

  • CE 20600 Technical Drawing and AutoCAD

    • Instructor: Bill Jackson
    • College of Engineering
    • Credit Hours: 2
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course is an introduction to computer-aided design and the theory and practice of technical drawing. We will be exploring a range of technologies used in civil engineering as well as other design disciplines. A substantial portion of the class will be dedicated to learning core concepts of technical drawing while introducing the fundamentals of AutoCAD. We will be grounding many of our inquiries with precedent case studies, allowing students to connect ongoing campus construction with theoretical classroom exercises. There are no prerequisites for this class.

  • BIOS 10010 The Climate Crisis: Intersection between Biology and Christianity

    • Instructor: David Medvigy
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course will explore how science and religion intersect in their analyses of climate change. We will emphasize two questions: (1) How has climate change over the past 30 years impacted biological organisms and ecosystems? (2) Why should Christians care about the impact of climate change on biology? Readings will be drawn from a basic science textbook, writings from recent popes and contemporary Orthodox writers and Scripture. The online class sessions will be active, and focused on discussion and activities. This never-offered-before course is open to all, and is inspired by the UND mission that various lines of Catholic thought may intersect with all forms of knowledge.

  • MATH 20985 The Math of COVID-19

    • Instructor: Y. Cooper & F. Janda
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 1.5
    • Max Seats: 24

    In this 3-week course, we will explore mathematical tools that can help us understand and address the COVID-19 pandemic. The course will have three parts. First, we will see how differential equations can be used to model the spread of COVID-19. Next, we will explore the mathematics of group testing, which is a method for testing a population for COVID-19 with fewer than one test per person. The final week of the course will be project-based. We will break into groups and using the tools we have learned, each will make testing recommendations to a fictional client (for example a company, school, sports league). There will be a final presentation.

  • THEO 24898 Theology, Worship, and the Arts

    University Requirement (2nd Theology); WKST

    • Instructor: Tim O' Malley
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 72

    In this course students will discover the inter-relationship between theology and the arts, with a specific focus on the orientation of the arts toward the worship of God. The course will consist of three parts. In the first part, students will focus on what God has to do with beauty. In the second part, students will look closely at why matter matters in Christian worship. In the third part, students will contemplate the inter-relationship between theology, worship and the arts through attending to painting, poetry, music, sculpture, stained glass windows, School of Architecture and sermons.

  • ARHI 43850 Thesis Workshop: Designing and Writing The Thesis

    • Instructor: Elyse Speaks
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 12

    This optional, one-credit class is intended for juniors and senior art history majors who are writing or considering (though not yet committed to) writing a senior thesis. This seminar-style workshop will feature a systematic approach to the various processes involved in writing the senior thesis. This includes developing a topic, collating and sharing research and comparing and critiquing writing methods and techniques. It will offer a variety of opportunities based on the individual’s stage of development. These range from initiating a project and applying for funding for research to drafting an outline for a project and completing a chapter.

  • NSCI 20200 The Strategic Value of the Seas

    • Instructor: Austin Chung
    • Department of Naval Science
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    The Strategic Value of the Seas course discusses the strategic economic, geopolitical, legal and militaristic value of the world’s bodies of waters. Through the study of historical and current events, the class will determine the value of the seas as it relates to political influence and economic power.

  • HIST 30955 The Violence of the First Encounter: US-Mexico Relationship during the 19th Century

    • Instructor: Jorge Puma
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course traces the development of the uneasy relationship between Mexico and the United States. The course is organized around key moments in the bilateral relationship from the arrival of English colonizers and Spanish conquerors to the Americas to the effects of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1938). The chronological framework of the course will help the student to understand how different events have affected the formation of a common space of conflict and exchange between Mexico and the United States. The course will focus on the process of state formation, but non-state actors will also be considered (women, intellectuals, immigrants, exiles, indigenous peoples, traders, etc.). The study of violence and ideas will play an important role in the course too, as they are interrelated with the developments that marked the shared history of both countries. In addition to recent scholarship and text-based primary sources, we will analyze artifacts of consumer and political culture, such as novels, songs and film. Students will achieve an historical perspective on the meaning and consequences of the interactions between Mexico and the United States within their societies and how that resulted in the emergence of different conceptions of citizenship and nationality. The course lecture is in English. Moreover, the course is designed without a Spanish language requirement nor previous knowledge of Mexican history in mind. However, a reading knowledge of Spanish is highly recommended, and there will be opportunities to read texts in Spanish for those willing to improve their proficiency in the language.

  • AFST, AMST, GSC, IIPS, ESS 33711, 30763, 30673, 30102, 30637 Transformative Justice: A Practical Introduction

    • Instructor: Pamela Butler
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    As calls to defund police and abolish prisons have gone mainstream in the United States, many who encounter those demands struggle to imagine alternatives to our punitive criminal legal system, especially when it comes to violent crime. This 1-credit course serves as a hands-on introduction to transformative justice – a feminist political framework for responding to violence without relying on punishment, incarceration, or policing. We will learn about the history and philosophy of transformative justice (TJ) as it has developed in Black, im/migrant, and Indigenous communities over many generations. We will read theoretical works, case studies and personal narratives from scholars, practitioners and community organizers seeking to solve the problem of violence without creating more violence. Most importantly, we will cultivate skills to build restorative and transformative responses to violence, abuse, and harm in our own relationships and communities. Our virtual class sessions will include a mix of discussion and activities, with an emphasis on collaboration and skill-building.

  • BIOS 30424 Tumor Cell Biology

    • Instructor: Zachary Schafer
    • College of Science
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 48

    This course will introduce undergraduate students to the basic biology of cancer through both lecture and research-based learning. It will focus on understanding how normal cells become tumor cells and the specific molecular and cellular properties of cancer cells that are important for tumor progression. The course will also introduce the student to the field of cancer research through the critical examination of primary literature. At the completion of this course, the student should be able to: a) Identify and comprehend the hallmarks of cancer cells b) Understand how altered molecular mechanisms in cancer cells contribute to tumor progression c) Analyze and discuss recent research in cancer biology.

  • CSLC 10156, 60156 Unlocking India, Kenya and Ecuador's Languages and Cultures

    • Instructor: Laura Cacuango Carvajal, Shivangi Nathawat, and Josephine Mutisya
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 40

    Offered for the first time this Winter Session, this new course gives students the key to India, Kenya and Ecuador's languages and cultures. Three of the Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures' Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistants (FLTAs) from these countries will teach language for basic communication in their native languages of Hindi, Swahili and Kichwa (Quechua) as well as share unique, fascinating details about their countries and cultures. The course will be split into three sections, each week focusing on one language and culture. Enroll to continue on the path toward being a global citizen. The CSLC offers courses in these three languages and cultures every semester.

  • HIST 30999 U.S. Immigration & Race

    • Instructor: James Breen
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    This course will explore the political efforts to restrict and control immigration in the United States between 1882 and 1924 as a means to understand the historical constructedness and instability of American racial categories. The course begins with the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and ends with the Johnson-Reed Act of 1924. Chinese exclusion marked what Erika Lee has called the beginning of the American gatekeeping era. This was when the country debated which racial, religious, class and gender categories should be restricted and removed from the United States. These categories, however, were neither fixed nor natural. They needed to be created. This course will focus on the competing and overlapping racial ideologies and unstable racial categories that informed American immigration restriction in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. Students will complete a final project that allows them to use the knowledge acquired through class readings and discussions to make their own arguments about a contemporary issue regarding immigration and race.

  • MDSC 43202 Visualizing Spatial Information with Maps and Dashboards

    • Instructor: Mat Sisk
    • Hesburgh Libraries
    • Credit Hours: 2
    • Max Seats: 48

    This course covers making maps and analyzing spatial information. It will show you how to use modern software to create maps and dashboards for spatial data. You will learn about the basics of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and how to use this tool to create the maps and visualizations you need for any project.

  • CDT 24610 Web Development Bootcamp

    Cross-listed with College of Arts and Letters

    • College of Engineering
    • Max Seats: 48

    Web development is an in-demand skill that spans across all job markets. However, getting into web development can feel somewhat daunting to those without backgrounds in computer science. Designed for students who have little or no prior coding/programming experience, South Bend Code School’s 3-week Web Development Bootcamp will demystify programming for the web, provide an introduction to databases, and equip students with the skills to deploy web applications online. Students will leave the bootcamp with a market-ready portfolio of work and a Certificate of Completion from South Bend Code School that will demonstrate their knowledge and skills to potential employers.

  • CDT 24610 Web Development Bootcamp

    Cross-listed with College of Engineering

    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Max Seats: 48

    Web development is an in-demand skill that spans across all job markets. However, getting into web development can feel somewhat daunting to those without backgrounds in computer science. Designed for students who have little or no prior coding/programming experience, South Bend Code School’s 3-week Web Development Bootcamp will demystify programming for the web, provide an introduction to databases, and equip students with the skills to deploy web applications online. Students will leave the bootcamp with a market-ready portfolio of work and a Certificate of Completion from South Bend Code School that will demonstrate their knowledge and skills to potential employers.

  • FYS 10419 What is Catholic Literature?

    • Instructor: David Griffith
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 24

    “What is Catholic Literature?” is a 1-credit, discussion-based course focused on how a writer’s faith journey finds expression through the making of literature and the ways that works written by writers who identify as Catholic can serve as aids to a reader’s spiritual and intellectual growth. Through the close reading and discussion of short stories, poetry and memoir, and through conversations with guest scholars and artists (via Zoom), we will discuss the ways that Catholic writers have sought to contend with issues of war, racism, the death penalty and sexual identity. Special emphasis will be placed on the role literary works have in reinforcing, shaping and, sometimes, challenging our spiritual beliefs. Readings will include works by Saint John Paul II and Jacques Maritain, fiction writers Flannery O'Connor, Toni Morrison and Phil Klay, and nonfiction writers Richard Rodriguez, Sister Helen Prejean and Kaya Oakes, among others.

  • CSC 23002 Winter Virtual Service Corps

    • Instructor: Felicia Johnson O'Brien
    • Center for Social Concerns
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 16

    Modeled from the Summer Service Learning Program (SSLP), the Winter Virtual Service Corps is a 1-credit service learning opportunity through the Center for Social Concerns (CSC). Students select a service organization from among a list of CSC community partners in South Bend and throughout the country. Serving remotely, students will be given engaging projects to assist their organizations 8-10 hours week from January 4 to January 22. The class meets weekly in small peer groups facilitated by a CSC staff member, with short weekly reading and writing assignments related to Catholic Social Tradition and social justice. Registration for the course is restricted to students who have applied and been accepted. The grading mode of this course is S/U. Apply between November 23 and December 4 using the link found here: https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/winter-virtual-service-corps

  • CSC 23002 Winter Virtual Service Corps

    • Instructor: Ben Wilson
    • Center for Social Concerns
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 16

    Modeled from the Summer Service Learning Program (SSLP), the Winter Virtual Service Corps is a 1-credit service learning opportunity through the Center for Social Concerns (CSC). Students select a service organization from among a list of CSC community partners in South Bend and throughout the country. Serving remotely, students will be given engaging projects to assist their organizations 8-10 hours week from January 4 to January 22. The class meets weekly in small peer groups facilitated by a CSC staff member, with short weekly reading and writing assignments related to Catholic Social Tradition and social justice. Registration for the course is restricted to students who have applied and been accepted. The grading mode of this course is S/U. Apply between November 23 and December 4 using the link found here: https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/winter-virtual-service-corps

  • CSC 23002 Winter Virtual Service Corps

    • Instructor: Emily Garvey
    • Center for Social Concerns
    • Credit Hours: 1
    • Max Seats: 16

    Modeled from the Summer Service Learning Program (SSLP), the Winter Virtual Service Corps is a 1-credit service learning opportunity through the Center for Social Concerns (CSC). Students select a service organization from among a list of CSC community partners in South Bend and throughout the country. Serving remotely, students will be given engaging projects to assist their organizations 8-10 hours week from January 4 to January 22. The class meets weekly in small peer groups facilitated by a CSC staff member, with short weekly reading and writing assignments related to Catholic Social Tradition and social justice. Registration for the course is restricted to students who have applied and been accepted. The grading mode of this course is S/U. Apply between November 23 and December 4 using the link found here: https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/winter-virtual-service-corps

  • AFST 30215 Witnessing the Sixties

    UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENT: WKHI (History)

    • Instructor: Peter Cajka
    • College of Arts and Letters
    • Credit Hours: 3
    • Max Seats: 24

    The purpose of this interdisciplinary course is twofold: to examine the social context and cultural change of the sixties and to explore the various journalistic and aesthetic representations of events, movements, and transformations. We will focus on the manner in which each writer or artist witnessed the sixties and explore fresh styles of writing and cultural expressions, such as the new journalism popularized by Tom Wolfe and the music/lyrics performed by Bob Dylan. Major topics for consideration include the counterculture and the movement--a combination of civil rights and anti-war protest.

Alyssa DiPaolo ‘22

Neuroscience and Behavior

“I'm going to study for the LSAT and work with Dr. Nancy Michael on neuroscience research. I've previously participated in programs hosted by the Center for Social Concerns, and recommend other students consider the Winter Virtual Service Corps opportunity this winter break.